IT

Q and A

As an IT professional, it is your job to make sure that any application being deployed on the network is safe and secure. But we know that you have other questions. You have invested a great deal of time and money in your corporate IT infrastructure. You want visibility into bandwidth requirements, technical requirements, scalability, upgrades, technical support, maintenance, and in the end, what sort of return on investment you can expect. Please give us a few minutes to answer your questions. We are confident you will be glad you did so.

 How does SVSi integrate video sources such as HD Cameras, Blu Ray players, Media Players, DVR’s, Computers, Satellite receivers, and Audio onto our network? Once on the network, how do I get the source material to my display?

 Video sources are converted to IP packets with an SVSi encoder. The encoder converts video, audio, and control signals into three separate IP packet streams – each with its own destination. The encoder compresses the video signals before packetization in order to transmit over gigabit Ethernet (GigE) networks. Once packetized, video packets are switched and routed identically to, and alongside, data packets. Each receiving display requires a decoder to accept video packets, re-synchronize, and output the video. The decoder supports high-denition (HD) resolutions up to 1080p and computer graphic (CG) resolutions up to 1600×1200.

Each encoder and decoder is equipped with a standard Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) network connection. Additionally, each device has multiple GigE connections allowing easy daisy-chaining. A single source video stream might be daisy-chained to a large number of displays. Since the infrastructure utilizes standard CAT5e cabling, it is “future-proof” and can be deployed by your existing network technicians with no special training.

As an IT professional, it is your job to make sure that any application being deployed on the network is safe and secure. But we know that you have other questions. You have invested a great deal of time and money in your corporate IT infrastructure. You want visibility into bandwidth requirements, technical requirements, scalability, upgrades, technical support, maintenance, and in the end, what sort of return on investment you can expect. Please give us a few minutes to answer your questions. We are confident you will be glad you did so.

 How does SVSi integrate video sources such as HD Cameras, Blu Ray players, Media Players, DVR’s, Computers, Satellite receivers, and Audio onto our network? Once on the network, how do I get the source material to my display?

 Video sources are converted to IP packets with an SVSi encoder. The encoder converts video, audio, and control signals into three separate IP packet streams – each with its own destination. The encoder compresses the video signals before packetization in order to transmit over gigabit Ethernet (GigE) networks. Once packetized, video packets are switched and routed identically to, and alongside, data packets. Each receiving display requires a decoder to accept video packets, re-synchronize, and output the video. The decoder supports high-denition (HD) resolutions up to 1080p and computer graphic (CG) resolutions up to 1600×1200.

Each encoder and decoder is equipped with a standard Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) network connection. Additionally, each device has multiple GigE connections allowing easy daisy-chaining. A single source video stream might be daisy-chained to a large number of displays. Since the infrastructure utilizes standard CAT5e cabling, it is “future-proof” and can be deployed by your existing network technicians with no special training.

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All SVSi devices currently support Ipv4. SVSi devices most-likely will not require IPv6 conversion during their service life-time but are eld-upgradeable to IPv6 if future transition is required.

Broadcast – used for auto-discovery of SVSi devices during installation or expansion
Multi-cast – all video and audio streams
Unicast – control signals to switch streams, set IP address, mute audio, etc…

Network switches direct packets from an input port to one or more destination ports based on header information. SVSi uses multicast packets for video streams allowing a single stream to be broadcast to multiple displays without duplicate streams consuming your network bandwidth. By utilizing streams of multicast packets, SVSi can be quickly deployed on your existing network, taking advantage of the multicast capability in switches you probably already own, with little or no infrastructure upgrade or impact.

There are three common types of network switches used to deploy SVSi:

Unmanaged – broadcast and multi-cast packets flood every port- unicast packets are dynamically switched port-to-port.

Layer-2: Supports virtual local-area-networks (VLANs) that switches traffic to statically assigned ports- broadcast, multicast, and unicast packets statically switched with VLANs. In practical terms, you can separate SVSi traffic onto its own virtual network to prevent multicast traffic from contending with the rest of the LAN, ensuring stable network performance for all hosts. On smaller or dedicated SVSi deployments, it may not be necessary to set up a vlan. However, for large numbers of sources and destinations, it will be advantageous to utilize VLANs.

Layer-3: Supports Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) that dynamically switches packets – supports VLANs – broadcast, multicast, and unicast packets statically switched with VLANs – multi-cast and unicast dynamically switched port-to-port with IGMP. If your existing switches can support IGMP, we highly recommend enabling it during deployment. IGMP will help direct traffic from a source to its destination or destinations without creating additional copies for multiple destinations. It is used to manage multi-cast groups, and to stop the network from being flooded with multi-cast traffic. When properly configured, the switch manages the Multi-Cast groups, and receivers join and leave groups as they switch between different live streams. This is particularly useful if your campus has several live events or feeds available on the network for users to select from for decoding and display.

Can I distribute my video over the web?

Yes! The SVSi VTT114 Transcoder accepts the SVSi JPEG2000 input video stream and converts to H.264 for applications such as internet streaming or video-to-the-desktop. Output resolutions from 480p/i to 1080i are supported and the H.264 bitrate can be adjusted from 500 kbps to 6 Mbps. The VTT114 transcodes low-latency codec conversion and integrates seamlessly with SVSi’s existing easy-to-use control options.

H.264 is motion-based compression that uses differences between sequential frames and provides lowest bit-rate transmission by sacrificing quality. The VTT114 outputs either unicast or multi-cast streams.

 What management tools are available to control SVSi’s system components?

 Management products are available in four forms: Conductor NetLite is a free software interface that installs on a host PC running Windows XP/Vista/7, or Mac OSX. It provides a single local user control of a SVSi network.

Conductor Server adds enhanced capabilities over NetLite. Conductor Server installs in a virtual machine environment which allows the program to be platform independent and run under Windows XP/Vista/7, Linux, and Mac OS X operating systems. Multiple users can access the system from any location through a web based interface.

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The SVSi VDT111 interfaces to third-party controllers to provide a simplified ASCII interface facilitating control and switching of a video distribution network.

Conductor DiVAS is a dedicated hardware implementation of the Conductor management system. Housed in a 2RU rack mountable unit, the DiVAS controller provides all the functionality of Conductor Server plus supports telnet and serial port control, email notifications, and an unlimited number of users through its web based interface.

OUR VISION


  • SVSi is a true pioneer in IP-based AV distribution and switching solutions shipping our first product in 2008. Since that time we have continued to lead this evolving industry with innovative solutions that have a single vision and purpose; provide end users with flexible, scalable, reliable, and affordable system solutions that meet their needs now and in the future.

    Advantage of IP Distribution
    • Cable run distances are standard – 100m between network ports for copper and up to 10km for single-mode ber
    • Low-cost network switches and appliances can be used for video just as for data
    • Standard network cabling reduces installation, maintenance, and replacement costs
    • Mature network protocols developed for data allow matrix switching of video by default
    • Supports video distribution by daisy-chaining or home-runs
    • One video steam can be daisy-chained to an unlimited number of displays

  • End user customers are demanding more capability from their AV installation and understand the benefits of AV technology that utilize existing, standards based networks. As these end users seek solutions to their corporate communications, video distribution and ProAV challenges based on IP and traditional IT technology, they quickly realize the clear solution is SVSi.

    Applications
    • Video Conference Narrowcasting and Distribution
    • Corporate and Retail Digital Signage
    • Sports Bar, Restaurant and Hospitality Content Distribution
    • Event and Conference Overflow Rooms
    • Collaborative Video Conferencing
    • Unbalanced Video Matrix (Flexible n x m versus Fixed n x n) Designs
    • Pro AV Over Existing IT Infrastructure
    • House of Worship Service/Event Recording and Extension
    • Education and Teaching Event Extension
    • HD Audio and Video Content From Anywhere To Anywhere